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Are outdoor chlorinated pools OK? - Whitey - 07-19-2012 10:51 AM

Or do you all avoid them? The gym I go to has indoor and outdoor pools. They say the outdoor pools are less toxic than indoor pools. I haven't swam in many years. Actually, I swam in a river / swimming pool here in East TN a few years ago but it made me sick. I think I absorbed E Coli or something, after swimming in it for about 5 times I realized I wasn't feeling too good from swimming there.

There aren't any clean places to swim in lakes around here. They all look green and full of algaecide, and it doesn't look to me to be pure enough to swim in, but some people do.

Would like to swim in the outdoor pool but I'm not sure if I want to expose myself to the chlorine. I swam in such pools often when I was a kid. I wish they had a healthier way of purifying the pools


RE: Are outdoor chlorinated pools OK? - audible - 07-19-2012 01:53 PM

(07-19-2012 10:51 AM)Whitey Wrote:  Or do you all avoid them? The gym I go to has indoor and outdoor pools. They say the outdoor pools are less toxic than indoor pools. I haven't swam in many years. Actually, I swam in a river / swimming pool here in East TN a few years ago but it made me sick. I think I absorbed E Coli or something, after swimming in it for about 5 times I realized I wasn't feeling too good from swimming there.

There aren't any clean places to swim in lakes around here. They all look green and full of algaecide, and it doesn't look to me to be pure enough to swim in, but some people do.

Would like to swim in the outdoor pool but I'm not sure if I want to expose myself to the chlorine. I swam in such pools often when I was a kid. I wish they had a healthier way of purifying the pools

We have a chlorine pool and after I get out I take a few drops of iodine.
I think I learned it from James. It is the same with the shower in my
summerhouse we have chlorine in the water, but not at home. I just
shower less. I know that James is not fond of iodine but I assume that
he means people overdo it and it is ok to take a few drops or get it in another way.
We now have to wait for James answer, but this is what I remember.


RE: Are outdoor chlorinated pools OK? - James - 07-20-2012 01:47 PM

(07-19-2012 10:51 AM)Whitey Wrote:  Or do you all avoid them?

I don't swim in pools too often. Normally if I swim it is in the lake, which is not very clean so I avoid it most of the time. The river is cleaner but a lot colder as well. And if I make it to the ocean I usually scuba dive instead of swim.

The gym I go to has indoor and outdoor pools. They say the outdoor pools are less toxic than indoor pools.

The only difference I can see between and indoor and outdoor pool would be the sunlight's disinfecting ultraviolet (UV) light. But this same UV light also reduces chlorine levels in a pool.


I haven't swam in many years. Actually, I swam in a river / swimming pool here in East TN a few years ago but it made me sick. I think I absorbed E Coli or something, after swimming in it for about 5 times I realized I wasn't feeling too good from swimming there.

There are a number of things you can pick up in water including E. coli, Cryptosporidium, Giardia, etc. Then there are toxins that may be present in rivers including dioxins, PCBs, mercury, etc. All depends on where in the country and factors such as cattle, mining or industry up river.

There aren't any clean places to swim in lakes around here. They all look green and full of algaecide, and it doesn't look to me to be pure enough to swim in, but some people do.

If water is green this means that the algae is flourishing. In order to flourish the algae must have "food" which is generally in the form of agricultural runoff, sewage and other sources of pollution. I have posted a few times on the blue-green "algae" (cyanobacteria) harvested fro Klamath Lake. That is a great example. The sellers of this "algae" claim the lake is "pristine", but you cannot grow large amounts of algae or cyanobacteria in a pristine lake. Studies have shown the lake is actually highly polluted and they are trying to figure out how to clean the lake up:


http://medcapsules.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?fid=531

Some algaes and cyanobacteria can also produce various toxins such as microcystins and anatoxins.

Would like to swim in the outdoor pool but I'm not sure if I want to expose myself to the chlorine. I swam in such pools often when I was a kid. I wish they had a healthier way of purifying the pools

There are various ways to purify pools. There are salt systems that generate smaller amounts of chlorine. There are also ozone systems for pools that use no chlorine and silver-copper electrode systems originally developed by NASA that kill bacteria and algae.



RE: Are outdoor chlorinated pools OK? - audible - 07-20-2012 02:08 PM

(07-20-2012 01:47 PM)James Wrote:  
(07-19-2012 10:51 AM)Whitey Wrote:  Or do you all avoid them?

I don't swim in pools too often. Normally if I swim it is in the lake, which is not very clean so I avoid it most of the time. The river is cleaner but a lot colder as well. And if I make it to the ocean I usually scuba dive instead of swim.

The gym I go to has indoor and outdoor pools. They say the outdoor pools are less toxic than indoor pools.

The only difference I can see between and indoor and outdoor pool would be the sunlight's disinfecting ultraviolet (UV) light. But this same UV light also reduces chlorine levels in a pool.


I haven't swam in many years. Actually, I swam in a river / swimming pool here in East TN a few years ago but it made me sick. I think I absorbed E Coli or something, after swimming in it for about 5 times I realized I wasn't feeling too good from swimming there.

There are a number of things you can pick up in water including E. coli, Cryptosporidium, Giardia, etc. Then there are toxins that may be present in rivers including dioxins, PCBs, mercury, etc. All depends on where in the country and factors such as cattle, mining or industry up river.

There aren't any clean places to swim in lakes around here. They all look green and full of algaecide, and it doesn't look to me to be pure enough to swim in, but some people do.

If water is green this means that the algae is flourishing. In order to flourish the algae must have "food" which is generally in the form of agricultural runoff, sewage and other sources of pollution. I have posted a few times on the blue-green "algae" (cyanobacteria) harvested fro Klamath Lake. That is a great example. The sellers of this "algae" claim the lake is "pristine", but you cannot grow large amounts of algae or cyanobacteria in a pristine lake. Studies have shown the lake is actually highly polluted and they are trying to figure out how to clean the lake up:


http://medcapsules.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?fid=531

Some algaes and cyanobacteria can also produce various toxins such as microcystins and anatoxins.

Would like to swim in the outdoor pool but I'm not sure if I want to expose myself to the chlorine. I swam in such pools often when I was a kid. I wish they had a healthier way of purifying the pools

There are various ways to purify pools. There are salt systems that generate smaller amounts of chlorine. There are also ozone systems for pools that use no chlorine and silver-copper electrode systems originally developed by NASA that kill bacteria and algae.

We do use copper so we can use less chlorine, but you can only do
that with a personal pool.


RE: Are outdoor chlorinated pools OK? - Whitey - 07-20-2012 04:34 PM

James,

Interesting info.

The lakes around here have no algae, they have algaecide to kill algae, and they actually are not green, they're teal. Every pond or lake I've ever seen in this area is the same color and it looks anything but inviting.


RE: Are outdoor chlorinated pools OK? - James - 07-20-2012 04:39 PM

[/quote]
We have a chlorine pool and after I get out I take a few drops of iodine.
I think I learned it from James. It is the same with the shower in my
summerhouse we have chlorine in the water, but not at home. I just
shower less. I know that James is not fond of iodine but I assume that
he means people overdo it and it is ok to take a few drops or get it in another way.
We now have to wait for James answer, but this is what I remember.

Yes, iodine can displace the chlorine.

And it is not that I am against iodine, it is the highly excessive, dangerous doses some people are recommending. Especially when so many people are reporting adverse effects from these doses and the iodine sellers are trying to blame the side effects on other things such as a "bromine detox", which I addressed earlier:

http://medcapsules.com/forum/showthread.php?tid=2485

It is like I totally advocate drinking sufficient water every day for health but I would not recommend drinking 2-3 gallons a day or drinking large amounts of water all at once since this is very dangerous and can be deadly.

The iodine sellers are recommending 100-150mg of iodine daily and making the extremely dangerous claim that "the more the better". Those levels are around a thousand times higher that what is considered to be a safe level. And there are many risks. In fact I am dealing with a friend right now who was put on a iodine rich drug. He started with the classic hyperthyroidism symptoms including severe weakness. I went with him to his doctor and discussed it with the doctor who agreed it was the medication messing with the thyroid. He cannot come of it cold turkey so he cut the dose in half, which threw him in to a severe state of hypothyroidism, which has left him even weaker. Unfortunately the drug has such a long half life that it is going to take about 9 months to get it back out of his system. He has started on the Thyroid Tonic to support the thyroid and is slowly getting his strength back and coming out of the mental confusion.

Point is that iodine is necessary for the body, but it also has toxicity in higher doses.

Also keep in mind that there are different forms of iodine. Potassium iodide is much safer than elemental iodine, which has a skull and crossbones on the bottle for a reason. Products such as the pharmaceutical drug Lugol's iodine contains some elemental iodine.

Personally I prefer that people get their iodine from natural sources such as seaweeds, black walnut hull, coconut oil, etc.

Some people have tried to claim that potassium iodide is the same as the iodine in kelp and therefore try to make it sound like it is natural. Potassium iodide is not natural and I have seen no evidence that iodine exists as potassium iodide in seaweeds. Regardless there is still a big difference between potassium iodide and seaweeds. Particularly the fact that seaweeds contain other synergistic compounds that help the iodine to function properly not found in potassium iodide. In addition, seaweeds also contain iodine antagonists in the form of other halogens, which prevent a toxic buildup of iodine in the system. In fact, the iodine sellers keep trying to mislead people in to thinking high doses of iodine are safe based on the average daily intake of iodine by the Japanese in their diet, which is well above what is considered a safe level. The important parts they fail to mention since it would discount their claims are the facts that their diet also contains other halogens from the seaweeds and ocean fish that prevent iodine toxicity and the synergistic compounds present.

Even the salt in the seaweeds and ocean fish will displace iodine due to the chloride component. What is really ironic is that every time someone posts their side effects from the toxic levels of iodine the iodine sellers claim the side effects are not from the iodine but still tell the people to do a "salt flush". What salt flushes do is to push out the excess toxic iodine out of the system. If the iodine is not causing these dangerous side effects then why would they want people to get their iodine levels so quickly by using salt flushes? Seems to me that they are more interested in boosting their iodine sales than they are in protecting the public.


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