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Coronary Blocked Arteries
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MarciGal Offline
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Coronary Blocked Arteries
My husband just got home from having triple bypass surgery. In April 2011, he had a heart attack and got a medicated stent put in and the other two vessels, he was told, were "about 60 percent" blocked but he was told it would take a long time for more blockage to happen.

Just over a year later, at the St. Vincent Heart Center in Indianapolis, they told him those vessels were almost totally blocked and there was a blockage near the stent! He doesn't eat a great diet and isn't a health nut like me, but he does eat better than most and but just came off the road after 8 months of long haul trucking three days before having symptoms that ended up with him having the bypass surgery at 60 years of age. Many of the patients there were in their 30s, 40s & 50s!!!

I say all that background to ask this: what do you believe is the root cause of heart vessels blocking up? Diet? Nutrients? Exercise? I would like to help him stay around as long as possible!

Thanks as always, James.

I feel like I'm diagonally parked in a parallel universe.
(This post was last modified: 07-24-2012 08:08 PM by MarciGal.)
07-24-2012 08:07 PM
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James Offline
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Post: #2
RE: Coronary Blocked Arteries
(07-24-2012 08:07 PM)MarciGal Wrote:  My husband just got home from having triple bypass surgery. In April 2011, he had a heart attack and got a medicated stent put in and the other two vessels, he was told, were "about 60 percent" blocked but he was told it would take a long time for more blockage to happen.

Just over a year later, at the St. Vincent Heart Center in Indianapolis, they told him those vessels were almost totally blocked and there was a blockage near the stent! He doesn't eat a great diet and isn't a health nut like me, but he does eat better than most and but just came off the road after 8 months of long haul trucking three days before having symptoms that ended up with him having the bypass surgery at 60 years of age. Many of the patients there were in their 30s, 40s & 50s!!!

I say all that background to ask this: what do you believe is the root cause of heart vessels blocking up? Diet? Nutrients? Exercise? I would like to help him stay around as long as possible!

Thanks as always, James.

Blood vessels clog in response to chronic inflammation of the arteries.

Basically, cholesterol is a healing agent for the body. Any place in the body that is injured will cause cholesterol to accumulate to help in the healing process. Therefore, when the arteries are injured the cholesterol accumulates to help act as a patch and to promote healing of the injured area. If the source of inflammation is not removed though then the cholesterol keeps flooding the area and depositing on the arterial wall.

Sources of arterial inflammation include high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking, xanthine oxidase from cow's milk and elevated homocysteine from hypothyroidism.

Other than addressing the cause some other things that will help include lecithin granules, magnesium malate, silica, natural vitamin C sources and trimethylglycine (TMG). Lecithin is a fat emulsifier that liquifies cholesterol including the cholesterol deposited on arterial walls. Magnesium malate helps to reduce blood pressure and displaces the calcium in the arterial plaque making it easier for removal. In cases of diabetes the magnesium also helps with insulin production and sensitivity. Magnesium and the malic acid bound to magnesium to make magnesium malate both increase ATP as well helping the heart to work more efficiently. Silica and vitamin C helps to increase arterial collagen reducing the risk of arterial damage and inflammation. Silica also provides mild anti-inflammatory properties. TMG reduces inflammatory homocysteine.

http://www.MountainMistBotanicals.com
07-26-2012 05:11 AM
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MarciGal Offline
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RE: Coronary Blocked Arteries
"Basically, cholesterol is a healing agent for the body. Any place in the body that is injured will cause cholesterol to accumulate to help in the healing process. Therefore, when the arteries are injured the cholesterol accumulates to help act as a patch and to promote healing of the injured area. If the source of inflammation is not removed though then the cholesterol keeps flooding the area and depositing on the arterial wall."

Would the cholesterol levels also rise during this process? Hubby's cholesterol has always been around 170-180. Seems the more the coronary arteries got blocked up the higher the cholesterol levels would be. Of course, that's just a wild speculation! And why do you think it's only the coronary arteries that get blocked up and not the other blood vessels throughout the body? Seems odd. Don't the rest of the blood vessels react to inflammation too?

His blood pressure isn't very high at all, he doesn't have hypothyroidism, hasn't smoked in 15 years, doesn't have diabetes and rarely drinks milk. He's not overweight either.

What things are best 'diet wise' for him to be eating, in your view? And I would imagine some exercise would be a good thing, too, yes? [The heart docs are giving him a lot of bad information like NO SALT AT ALL and low fat. Good thing I know better than that! At least they DID recommend exercise and cardio 'rehab'!]

I feel like I'm diagonally parked in a parallel universe.
(This post was last modified: 07-26-2012 08:42 AM by MarciGal.)
07-26-2012 08:40 AM
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James Offline
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RE: Coronary Blocked Arteries
(07-26-2012 08:40 AM)MarciGal Wrote:  "Basically, cholesterol is a healing agent for the body. Any place in the body that is injured will cause cholesterol to accumulate to help in the healing process. Therefore, when the arteries are injured the cholesterol accumulates to help act as a patch and to promote healing of the injured area. If the source of inflammation is not removed though then the cholesterol keeps flooding the area and depositing on the arterial wall."

Would the cholesterol levels also rise during this process?

Cholesterol can rise if there is a chronic inflammation in the body since the body requires a higher level of cholesterol in these incidences. What a lot of people do not realize is that the diet provides very little in the way of cholesterol since most of it is bound by dietary sterols. The majority of the body's cholesterol is synthesized by the liver.

Stress also raises cholesterol because the body requires more cholesterol during these times to produce the body's anti-stress hormones.


Hubby's cholesterol has always been around 170-180. Seems the more the coronary arteries got blocked up the higher the cholesterol levels would be. Of course, that's just a wild speculation!

Not really. The cholesterol deposition is not the cause of the inflammation, it is the product of the inflammation.


And why do you think it's only the coronary arteries that get blocked up and not the other blood vessels throughout the body? Seems odd. Don't the rest of the blood vessels react to inflammation too?

The arteries are more subject to damage because of the pressures they have to sustain. Same reason the veins have thinner walls and the arteries have thicker, more muscular walls. The arteries are subjected to very high pressures that the veins are not subjected to. So they can be damaged from things such as high blood pressure or insulin damage during "sugar diabetes". Since they veins are not subjected to as much constant damage it is easier for them to heal quickly compared to the arteries.


His blood pressure isn't very high at all, he doesn't have hypothyroidism, hasn't smoked in 15 years, doesn't have diabetes and rarely drinks milk. He's not overweight either.

Could be something as simple as a deficiency of silica, which is common as we age due to declining stomach acid levels. If a person uses antacids, proton pump inhibitors (acid blockers) alkaline waters, some alkaline supplements like calcium carbonate or magnesium oxide these will increase the risk of heart disease by interfering with silica absorption. Silica is essential for the production of the collagen and elastin in blood vessels that strengthens the blood vessels. Silica also helps reduce arterial inflammation.

A lack of vitamin C can also reduce collagen and elastin in the blood vessels.

Remember the study that was all over the news where they tried to claim that vitamin C was found to increase the risk of heart disease? The media misinterpreted the findings of the study and everyone ran with it. What the study claimed was that the vitamin C was thickening the arterial walls, which is exactly what it is supposed to do. This allows the arteries to handle those higher pressures. But some people misinterpret this to mean that the thicker walls were narrowing the arteries increasing the development of heart disease. This is not even close to being true. The arteries are muscles and expand and contract as needed. Even if the walls of the arteries thicken to handle the higher arterial pressures the arteries can still relax opening them up for increased blood flow. Therefore, the increased wall thickness is normal and beneficial, not detrimental as the media claimed.


What things are best 'diet wise' for him to be eating, in your view?

Mostly vegetables. Dark green vegetables in particular for the high magnesium content. Deep, cold water fish such as cod and haddock are great. Salmon is good if you can guarantee it is wild caught. But some of the farm raised is being passed off as wild by dying the meat pink. Farm raised is loaded with heavy metals from the feed. Vitamin C rich foods would also be great as well as some soluble and insoluble fiber sources such as oatmeal, brown rice, etc. Dairy should be limited. I know you were making the kombucha tea. That would be great if you are still making it.


And I would imagine some exercise would be a good thing, too, yes?

Yes, that is always important since it provides so many benefits. For example, lowering blood sugar and improving circulation.


[The heart docs are giving him a lot of bad information like NO SALT AT ALL and low fat. Good thing I know better than that! At least they DID recommend exercise and cardio 'rehab'!]

You are right. Only about 10% of the population is salt (sodium) sensitive. In the other 90% of the population a lack of salt can actually cause problems such as high blood pressure. Still, if using salt it is best to use a trace element salt that provides other minerals as well. I really prefer the mined salts, like Real Salt over the sea salts like Celtic Salt since it is cleaner.

http://www.MountainMistBotanicals.com
07-27-2012 08:34 AM
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JC73 Offline
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RE: Coronary Blocked Arteries
No salt and low fat worked for me but you will need an iodine supplement if you give up salt.

My fasting blood glucose went from 136 to its current 75 and my blood pressure went from an average of 210/110 to 120/68......after several years on a low fat vegan diet....McDougall/Fuhrman diet.Vegetables,brown rice,beans,and potatoes....no meat or dairy and no oils.

I can't say for sure its an oveall healthy diet until another decade goes by but it did solve some serious cardio problems.
07-28-2012 06:26 AM
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MarciGal Offline
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RE: Coronary Blocked Arteries
During the last six months or so, my husband's 65 year old brother has had bleeding varicose veins in his throat which caused him to lose a lot of blood. After that was healed, he had a stent put in his heart. Docs told him it was because of 'fatty liver disease' that this all happened. I just can't figure out the connection, if there really IS one. His brother does eat the S.A.D. diet, takes the usually array of Rx, only drinks occasionally, doesn't smoke.

I was shocked when I saw him [when hubby was getting his bypass last week] because he looked more like 85, skin and bones, incoherent, slow moving, low raspy speech, unsteady on his feet and all over the road when driving. Scared the daylights out of me since I was staying with them and he drove us to the hospital every day! He is a total AMA poster child.

So how does one getting a fatty liver, if that is a right diagnosis, without being a big drinker and is there a connection between that and those varicose veins in his throat?

I feel like I'm diagonally parked in a parallel universe.
(This post was last modified: 07-28-2012 07:58 AM by MarciGal.)
07-28-2012 07:24 AM
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MarciGal Offline
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RE: Coronary Blocked Arteries
The arteries are more subject to damage because of the pressures they have to sustain. Same reason the veins have thinner walls and the arteries have thicker, more muscular walls. The arteries are subjected to very high pressures that the veins are not subjected to. So they can be damaged from things such as high blood pressure or insulin damage during "sugar diabetes". Since they veins are not subjected to as much constant damage it is easier for them to heal quickly compared to the arteries.

Does that mean that the vessel taken from his leg which is now being used as a bypass for the blocked heart vessels will now also have the chance of becoming blocked as well?

I feel like I'm diagonally parked in a parallel universe.
07-29-2012 07:17 AM
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James Offline
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RE: Coronary Blocked Arteries
(07-28-2012 07:24 AM)MarciGal Wrote:  During the last six months or so, my husband's 65 year old brother has had bleeding varicose veins in his throat which caused him to lose a lot of blood. After that was healed, he had a stent put in his heart. Docs told him it was because of 'fatty liver disease' that this all happened. I just can't figure out the connection, if there really IS one. His brother does eat the S.A.D. diet, takes the usually array of Rx, only drinks occasionally, doesn't smoke.

I was shocked when I saw him [when hubby was getting his bypass last week] because he looked more like 85, skin and bones, incoherent, slow moving, low raspy speech, unsteady on his feet and all over the road when driving. Scared the daylights out of me since I was staying with them and he drove us to the hospital every day! He is a total AMA poster child.

So how does one getting a fatty liver, if that is a right diagnosis, without being a big drinker and is there a connection between that and those varicose veins in his throat?

The simple explanation is that the veins in the throat eventually drain in to the portal vein of the liver. In cases of liver damage, particularly cirrhosis, the blood can "back up" in the venous system leading to increased pressure. As I had mentioned earlier the walls of veins are very thin compared to arteries. So the thinner walls of the veins easily stretch out under the increased pressure. When the back pressure from the portal vein increases pressure in the esophageal veins they stretch out as well since they are not designed to handle the higher pressures. This extreme dilation is known as esophageal varices. In severe cases the veins can bleed or even rupture, which is why the condition is so dangerous.

Cirrhosis can develop from a number of reasons including various forms of hepatitis, alcohol abuse, some medications, hemochromatosis, Wilson's disease, etc.

http://www.MountainMistBotanicals.com
07-29-2012 04:47 PM
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James Offline
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RE: Coronary Blocked Arteries
(07-29-2012 07:17 AM)MarciGal Wrote:  The arteries are more subject to damage because of the pressures they have to sustain. Same reason the veins have thinner walls and the arteries have thicker, more muscular walls. The arteries are subjected to very high pressures that the veins are not subjected to. So they can be damaged from things such as high blood pressure or insulin damage during "sugar diabetes". Since they veins are not subjected to as much constant damage it is easier for them to heal quickly compared to the arteries.

Does that mean that the vessel taken from his leg which is now being used as a bypass for the blocked heart vessels will now also have the chance of becoming blocked as well?

Yes. Bypasses generally block up after a few years. In rare cases a person can make it past a decade.

The problem goes back to the inflammation. Bypasses plug up faster than the original blockage due to the increased inflammation. When a blood vessel is harvested for a bypass the blood vessel is subjected to a large amount of trauma. The blood vessel is cut, handled, trimmed and sewn in to place. All this trauma sets up an immediate inflammatory reaction leading to severe plaque formation.

Sometimes a saphenous vein is used for the bypass. But again veins are thinner and more prone to damage than arteries. Therefore bypasses with veins would likely plug back up faster than bypasses done with arteries.

The good news is that there are things that can be done to help prevent the bypass from clogging back up. Lecithin granules for example help to clean out cholesterol plaques. Silica can help strengthen the blood vessel walls and reduce inflammation. Natural vitamin C sources can also help strengthen the walls. Trimethylglycine (TMG) reduces inflammatory homocysteine helping to prevent plaque formation.

http://www.MountainMistBotanicals.com
07-29-2012 05:11 PM
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